Happy day of commercial exploitation of love

Today was Valentine’s Day. I’ve been a long-time resistor. Might seem odd since I’ve had a boyfriend for most of my life. But commercialism ruins it, just like it ruins Christmas. It seems Valentine’s Day is a commercial exploitation of love to make couples spend a bunch of money and to get single people to feel bad about themselves. They know how to market Valentine’s Day to single people, too. You can buy yourself chocolates to cheer yourself up. Or you can throw and anti-Valentines Day party. Or you can do what I do and not spend any extra money on February 14. Take that, Hallmark.

Required romance is not romance at all. I don’t want to get flowers because he’d be in the doghouse if he didn’t send me flowers. So I get flowers at random for no reason. Not very often, because they’re just generally a waste of money. But spontaneity is romantic. Valentine’s Day is not.  I rest my case.

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About Nicole

Daughter of God, wife, mother, volunteer youth leader, substitute teacher, aspiring writer, rabbit owner, nature lover. These are some of my titles.
This entry was posted in Relationships and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Happy day of commercial exploitation of love

  1. FoolsGold says:

    True, commercialism ruins spontaneity and results in a forced, though not necessarily false, generosity. The word chocolate comes from the phrase for Food of the Gods and many women find that any occasion to eat chocolate is just dandy with them. Indeed, a variety of Chocolate Cafes have opened wherein fine chocolate and fine coffee is available. Women who might otherwise meet for lunch are often now meeting with their girlfriends at various chocolate bars.

    Flowers are often enjoyed for their beauty but let us not forget that most of the fragrance notes are olfactory analogues of estrogen and prior to the growth of our pharmaceutical industry were the only estrogen supplements available to a woman.

    So enjoy the decadence of even a forced generosity linked to commercialism.

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